What Should We Think About Israel?—Answers for All Things Israel

In Blogs, Resources from The Friends of Israel by Steve ConoverLeave a Comment

I’m frequently asked for book recommendations on subjects related to Israel and the Bible. Sometimes, a person is looking to dive deep into a specific topic like prophecy, Israel’s history, or current events in the Middle East. Others want to expand their big-picture understanding of Israel and how all the puzzle pieces fit together. Maybe you fall into the first group and feel like you can’t quite make one particular puzzle piece fit. Or, perhaps you find yourself more in the other category and would be happy just to get the puzzle box open!

Lately, I have recommended one book more often than others to those who want a more comprehensive, biblical understanding of Israel: Dr. Randall Price’s What Should We Think About Israel?

This study contains contributions from various perspectives, which will create meaningful dialogue with those in your circle of influence. Each chapter focuses on a unique, thoroughly answered question that provides a historical, legal, and biblical perspective on Israel. The questions Dr. Price selected for this book are like a survey of the most important topics we engage with at The Friends of Israel Gospel Ministry (FOI). 

Last year, I led my ministry team through weekly discussions of this book. Our group was made up of a mix of people representing not only different generations but a wide variety in length of time serving with FOI (which made for exciting conversations). One of our goals was to better equip our team to understand and defend the important issues related to Israel and the Middle East, both personally and in ministry. We also viewed it as an opportunity to shape the content we create and bring to you through the various platforms by which we connect with you. 

Hamas’s attacks on Israel in October and the ensuing war brought with it a great desire in many Christians to understand better God’s program for Israel, the church, and the nations.

Whether a person was just starting his or her ministry with us or had been here for a few decades, our team profited from this study. I cannot say enough good things about this book’s influence on our team, especially in light of current events. Undoubtedly, it will shape what we bring to you through our magazine, videos, radio show, and blog.

Hamas’s attacks on Israel in October and the ensuing war brought with it a great desire in many Christians to understand better God’s program for Israel, the church, and the nations. Many of the questions I’ve recently received are answered in What Should We Think About Israel?—questions like: What should we think about the modern State of Israel and its right to the land? Jewish and Arab relations? Israel’s “occupation”? Zionism? Antisemitism? What about the plight of the Palestinians?

These questions are answered by experts like Thomas Ice, Paul Wilkinson, Walter Kaiser Jr., Mitch Glaser, Michael Brown, and Arnold Fruchtenbaum. The book features an excellent foreword written by Mark Hitchcock, an introduction by Mark L. Bailey, and an insightful and encouraging afterword by Randall Price. The appendices are gold—an interview with Israeli pastor Meno Kalisher on relations with Arabs and Arab Christians, and a dialogue between Jews for Jesus CEO David Brickner and Pastor John Piper on their opposing views on Israel. 

I can’t think of a book that deals with the issues we need to understand more clearly and fairly than this one. In light of all that is happening in the world and the confusion surrounding the complexities of the Middle East, if there is only one book on Israel you read this year, make it What Should We Think About Israel?

To purchase a copy of  What Should We Think About Israel? visit our online store.

About the Author
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Steve Conover

Steve is the Executive Vice President, Chief Operating Officer and Vice President of Media Ministries for The Friends of Israel Gospel Ministry.

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